Carolina Mountain Club

CMC OM - Trail Maintenance

The Maintenance Committee is responsible for managing the maintenance the approximately 425-450 miles of trail for which CMC has accepted responsibility, and for building new trail as required. The total mileage may vary based on our negotiated agreements.

CMC currently has responsibility for 

 

Except for a small portion of the MST that traverses land owned by The Nature Conservancy, all of the above trails are on public property and are managed by the appropriate public agency.

During hunting season or in the winter, when maintenance on the trails listed above is either unadvisable or impossible, CMC also maintains trail in the

  • Carl Sandberg Home National Historic Site in Flat Rock;
  • Green River Game Lands near Hendersonville;
  • Johnson Farm, a historic farm owned by the Henderson County School system; and
  • Kellogg Center, a conference center owned by University of North Carolina-Asheville.

We have no commitment to continue maintaining these trails, and do not have agreements with the land managers.

CMC has provided trail building on selected Conserving Carolina lands (Florence Tract, Bearwallow and Little Bearwallow Mountains). When requested, and when trail crew time is available, CMC will consider building trails for other organizations. Each request will be evaluated on its merits. It is not CMC practice to build trails that are not available for use by the public.

In addition to building and maintaining trails, the Maintenance Committee is also responsible for:

  • Negotiating agreements with the public agencies that manage the land on which we are building or maintaining trails (These agreements establish the procedures to be used in our building and maintain trails on their land. Agreements will be established only when CMC has undertaken a long-term commitment to maintaining a trail);
  • Maintaining trail maintenance information on both the maintenance and main CMC webpages, e.g. keeping the list of certified sawyers current;
  • Making website support personnel – currently Tim Carrigan – aware when changes are needed to the functionality of the maintenance webpage;
  • Managing the award system that recognizes trail maintainers who have achieved various levels of cumulative volunteer work hours;
  • Organizing and holding an annual Trail Maintainers’ Picnic;
  • Maintaining an inventory of tools used by the trail maintenance crews;
  • Writing and submitting grant requests for tools and materials needed for trail building/maintenance;
  • Reporting volunteer work hours to CMC partners quarterly;
  • Representing the CMC trail maintenance function to periodic meetings with partners (FS Districts, BRP, Conserving Carolina, FMST, ATC);
  • Ensuring that trail maintainers are properly trained and appropriately certified to operate mechanized equipment;
  • Ensuring that trained Section Maintainers are assigned to all sections of the AT and MST;
  • Recruiting and retaining new volunteers; and
  • Operating within budgeted funds provided by the CMC for operating expenses, mileage reimbursement, and picnic costs

 

Agreements

  • We have made long-term commitments to maintain trail on land managed by Pisgah Ranger District of Pisgah National Forest (PRD) (http://www.carolinamountainclub.org/index.cfm/do/pages.view/id/294/page/Pisgah-Ranger-District-Agreements).
  • We have made long-term commitments to maintain the MST from Heintooga Road to Black Mountain Campground. Much of this trail is on land managed by the Blue Ridge Parkway (BRP), and we have negotiated an agreement (web link) covering this work.
  • We have a Memorandum of Understanding (web link) with the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission covering maintenance of 13.7miles of trail in the Green River Game Lands.
  • We are in the process of negotiating agreements with the Appalachian Ranger District of Pisgah National Forest (ARD). It will be added to the Club’s website when finalized.
  • We need to discuss entering into an agreement with the Nantahala Ranger District of Nantahala National Forest.
  • Daily agreements are entered into with the State of North Carolina Department of Parks and Recreation when work is performed on land that they manage. Once the agreements ARD has been finalized, we need to discuss whether a longer-term agreement would be beneficial.
  • Appalachian Trail Conservancy (ATC) maintains a relationship with the Cherokee National Forest. A CMC agreement with the USFS covering the limited amount of work we do in this Forest does not seem necessary. ATC also maintains relationship with the Town of Hot Springs. A CMC agreement with the town covering the very limited amount of work we do within the town boundary does not seem necessary.
  • We have an agreement with The Nature Conservancy covering maintenance of the MST on their Richland Balsam Tract (web link).
  • We have an agreement with Conserving Carolina covering the building of trails on Bearwallow Mountain (web link).

Maintaining contact with these land managers and others involved in our maintenance efforts is a major task. Attachment 1 is a list of current contacts. The Chair of the Maintenance Committee or his/her designee is responsible for keeping it up-to-date.

 

Types of Trail Maintenance

CMC members are involved in trail building and maintenance at five levels as:

  • Trail crew leaders,
  • Trail crew members,
  • AT/MST Section Maintainer Supervisors
  • Section maintainers, or
  • Participants in quarterly workdays.

We also receive trail-building support from ATC’s Konnarock Crew. Each part of CMC’s program is discussed below.

Trail Crews

The seven CMC work crews and their crew leaders are listed on the Club’s website at: http://www.carolinamountainclub.org/index.cfm/do/pages.view/id/36/page/Trail-Work-Schedule.

The standards to which these crews work are defined in the agreements discussed above.

The first five of these crews:

  1. Burnsville Monday Crew
  2. Waynesville West Crew (Wednesday).
  3. Thursday Crew
  4. Asheville Friday Crew
  5. Pisgah Friday Crew

meet weekly and are what most Club members think about when the topic of work crews is raised. Crew leaders are responsible for deciding what work the crew will do each week.

When selecting work, Crew Leaders start with their list of assigned trails – AT Sections, MST Sections, specific FS District or BRP trails, other organization trails. Priority is given first to the AT, then the MST and then other assigned trails. In the Spring, a complete “walk thru” of the AT and then the MST is performed by all the crews with each assigned to a specific portion of those trails. It is expected that each crew will work on all its assigned trails at least once each year.

The Wilderness Crew meets two Saturdays a month, and works in the two wilderness areas in Pisgah Ranger District, Middle Prong and Shining Rock.  The crew must meet the standards for wilderness trail maintenance, which are defined in our agreement with PRD.

The last crew, the Quarterly Saturday Crew, which will actually meet five times in 2014, is discussed below under Quarterly Work Days.

Trail crewmembers are largely recruited by word-of-mouth, but a standing invitation to join the trail crews and other maintenance activities is included on the CMC website at http://www.carolinamountainclub.org/index.cfm/do/pages.view/id/30/page/Ongoing-Participation.

In the past, CMC’s Council had approved policies requiring trail crewmembers and section maintainers to be Club members. However, because individuals who were not Club members were making substantial contributions to our trail building and maintenance efforts, various methods were employed to circumvent these policies.  In 2014, the Council recognized that this approach was inappropriate and passed a resolution (Attachment 2) rescinding these prior policies. CMC strongly encourages all trail maintainers to become members, but accepts that a small number will chose not to. On occasion, other organizations, e.g. the Greenville (TN) Natural History Association, have taken responsibility for maintaining a section of the A.T. The Club didn’t ask members of these associations to become CMC members.

Section Maintainers

Section Maintainers commit to maintaining 2-5 miles of either the A.T. or MST. Their work is coordinated either by the A.T. Supervisor or one of the six Supervisors for the MST. Guidelines for A.T. section maintainers are shown at: http://www.carolinamountainclub.org/index.cfm/do/pages.view/id/19/page/Maintainer---AT.

Guidelines for MST section maintainers are shown at: http://www.carolinamountainclub.org/index.cfm/do/pages.view/id/16/page/Guidelines---MST.

The current lists of A.T. and MST Section Maintainers are shown at http://www.carolinamountainclub.org/_maps/maintainerLists.cfm?sectionGroupID=5, and http://www.carolinamountainclub.org/_maps/maintainerLists.cfm?sectionGroupID=4, respectively.

If Section Maintainers encounter conditions on their section that are beyond their capabilities, they are expected to notify the appropriate trail crew to remediate these conditions.

Many hikers view being a section maintainer, especially on the A.T., as a way of giving back, and ask for the opportunity. A.T. sections rarely remain open for an extended period of time. The same is less true of MST sections, where remote sections may be open for months. When a section does not have an assigned Section Maintainer, it becomes the responsibility of the trail crew with overall responsibility for it.

Section Maintainers must be CMC members.

Quarterly Work Days

The quarterly workdays are designed to allow people who cannot commit to working as either a trail crewmember or a Section Maintainer, or who are new to trail maintenance, to become involved in CMC’s trail maintenance program.  Typically 25-30 people show up at these sessions, including many who are either crewmembers or Section Maintainers. The work is chosen to include all levels of skill and physical ability. Currently the quarterly workdays are devoted to building the remaining portion of the MST CMC is responsible for. In the past, quarterly workdays have been devoted to more routine trail maintenance. After gaining experience on Saturday workdays, many new trail maintainers go on to become Section Maintainers or trail crew members.

Konnarock Crew

ATC supports the trail-maintaining clubs in the Virginia and Deep South Regions with the Konnarock Crew, a volunteer trail-building crew that is active for eight weeks during the summer.  Volunteers typically work for a week, and their projects are broken into weeklong segments. This crew typically camps near its projects, and therefore is more suited to carrying out projects remote from trailheads, such as the relocation of the A.T. into the Rocky Fork Tract, than CMC’s trail crews, which would have to spend much of the day hiking into and from the work site.

The Konnarock Steering Committee sets Konnarock Crew’s priorities. It meets in conjunction with the Spring Partnership Meeting, a joint meeting of the Virginia Area and Deep South Regional Partnership Committees (RPCs). CMC has representation on this committee for three out of five years. One of CMC’s RPC representatives should join the committee when CMC has a seat, and prepare to represent the club by discussing the club’s requests for support with the Maintenance Committee Chair.

The Virginia Area (VARO) and Deep South (SORO) Regional Directors solicit requests for work by the Konnarock Crew prior to the Steering Committee meeting. Konnarock’s work is initially planned five years in advance to comply with federal government budgeting practices. The Steering Committee prioritizes these requests and also adjusts Konnarock’s priorities for nearer term years, if needed.  Attachment 3 provides Konnarock planning background information supplied by ATC.

SORO meets with CMC trail maintenance leadership annually to review the contents of the five-year plan for major AT work.  During that meeting, work suggested for Konnarock is identified.  Smaller projects listed may be assigned to the CMC to complete.

Trail Maintenance Webpage and Databases

The trail maintenance webpage: http://www.carolinamountainclub.org/members/maintenance_menu.cfm contains the forms and reports that trail maintainers use to document their work, lists of A.T. and MST section maintainers, maps of these trails and of PRD and ARD; and other information that supports the Club’s maintenance efforts. The page includes two databases, one that is used to record maintenance hours worked, the other to record trail issues that need to be resolved. The hours worked database is linked to the membership database, so that the information about individual volunteers is the same in both places. Tim Carrigan, a CMC volunteer, provides support for this page and the databases.

 

Trail Maintainer Awards

A variety of awards are available to CMC trail maintainers based on volunteer hours worked. These are listed in Attachment 4.

 

Trail Maintainers’ Picnic

The Maintenance Committee holds an annual picnic, open to all Maintenance Crew members and AT/MST Section Maintainers, wives/significant others and children on the third Saturday in September.  It is currently being held at Lake Julian Park.  The Club provides grilled fare and drinks while attendees are requested to bring munchies, salads, casseroles and deserts.  Live music has been provided to date. (This is also addressed in Part G. Club-wide Activities.)

Job Descriptions

Attachment 5 contains the seven job descriptions that have been written for Maintenance Committee responsibilities:

  • Chair of the Maintenance Committee
  • Trail Crew Leader
  • Trail Crew Member
  • Trails Facilities Manager
  • Wilderness Trail Crew Leader
  • AT/MST Section Maintenance Supervisor
  • AT/MST Section Maintainer

 

Attachment 1: Trail Building and Maintenance Contact List - updated 1/20/2019

Note: These are subject to change.

 

 ATC Southern Regional Office (SORO), Asheville, 828-254-3708

                        Morgan Sommerville, Regional Director, msommerville@appalachiantrail.org

                        Leanna Joyner, Trail Resources Mgr, ljoyner@appalachiantrail.org 

Julie Judkins, Community Programs Coordinator, jjudkins@appalachiantrail.org   

Matt Drury Resource Management Coordinator, mdrury@appalachiantrail.org

Kristen Cozza Office Mgr. kcozza@appalachiantrail.org

        Appalachian Trail Conservancy

        Southern Regional Office

       160A Zillicoa Street

       Asheville, NC  28801          

ATCHeadquarters – Harper’s Ferry VA.         

Robert Proudman–Director of Conservation Activities 304.535.6331,Ext103; Bproudman@appalachiantrail.org

           

Friends of the MST  (FMST)

Kate Dixon, Exec. Dir., 919-698-9024, kdixon@ncmst.org

                                         PO Box 10431

                                         Raleigh, NC  27605 (www.ncmst.org)

                         Hugh Stephens, Asheville contact, hwstephens@bellsouth.net

 

Friends of the BRP

Fernando Gracia - Coordinator Of Programs,                                           fernando_gracia@friendsbrp.org>mailto:Rod_Broker@FriendsBRP.org

Dan Wells – Asheville Friends

Dave Poteet – Head of Friends (2013)

Susan Mills 1-800-228-7275 susan_mills@friendsBRP.org

 

National Forests in North Carolina

Kristin Bail –Forest Supervisor, 828.257.4269 kmbail@fs.fed.us

Eric Crews - Trails    ecrews@fs.fed.us

 

Pisgah Forest

     ARD- Mars Hill 828-689-9694

Richard Thornburgh, District Ranger, 828-380-2967, rthornburgh@fs.fed.us

                        David Mc Fee, Vol Coordinator, dmcfee@fs.fed.us, trails

     PRD -Davidson River.

Derek Ibarguen District Ranger

                        Patrick Scott, Trails, pscott@fs.fed.us,

                        Bill Coates, Vol. Coord.  wcoates@fs.fed.us

Dave Finan, Wilderness Coord.

 

Cherokee Nat. Forest - Nolichucky/Unaka Dist. , 423-638-4109

Leslie Morgan, District Ranger, 423-783-2401, lesliemmorgan@fs.fed.us

 Gray Buckles Trails Technician,  (423)-638-8731, sbuckles@fs.fed.us

 

NC State Parks

Tim Johnson – Regional Trails Specialist  (O) 828-659-8706  (C) 828-713-5487 tim.johnson@ncparks.gov

 

NC State Parks - Mt Mitchell

Jack Bradley Jr. Park Super. 828-675-4611

Johnathen Griffett Vol. Coord. 828-675-4611

 

NC State Parks - Chimney Rock

Park Supt, Fax # 625-4039,

Tyson Phillips, Vol. Coord, 625-1823, tyson.phillips@ncdenr.gov

Jim Ledgerwood,Trails, 625-1823, james.ledgerwood@ncparks.gov

Karen Johnson, Office Assistant, 625-1823, karen.e.johnson@ncparks.gov

 

Attractions (contractor)

Mary Jaeger-Gale, GM, 625-9611 Ext. 813, maryjg@chimneyrockpark.com

Matt Popowski, PR, 625-9611 Ext. 812, prandevents@Chimneyrockpark.com

Joey Allen, Trails/Landscape, 625-0388, jallen@chimneyrockpark.com

 

NC Recreational Coordinator.

Dwayne Stutzman. 828-296-4692(W) 828-712-5590(cell)

 

SC State Park.- Georges.

Steve Pagano, Superintendent, 966-9099

 

Nature Conservancy

Margit Butcher, Asst. Dir. Science & Stewardship 919-403-8558

  

Conserving Carolina

 Jenna Anderson, jennaanderson@carolinamountain.org

Peter Barr – Trails Manager, 704-941-9296, pjbarr@conservingcarolina.org

 

Blue Ridge Parkway – Superintendent’s Office 828.271-4779

J. D. Lee - Superintendent  

Monika Mayr – Deputy Superintendent

Marshall Lovedahl, Balsam Gap Maint.  456-8829

                                       Asheville Regional Super- Maint. 273-3071

Leesa Brandon, Partner Coord., leesa_brandon@partner.nps.gov 

 828.348.3420                              

Chris Ulrey, Ph.D., Plant Ecologist, x271

David Anderson Landscape Architect , J_David_Anderson@nps.gov>MAPS 348.4211

Michele Maertens, Room Res., Michele_Maertens@nps.gov, 407-5630

Marshall Lovedahl - Maint mgr. Balsam-South of 215, marshall_lovedahl@nps.gov, 456-8829

Cal Clardy - Maint. Mgr, East North of NC 215, Calvin_Clardy@nps.gov,

Mike Molling - Maintenance Asheville michael_molling@nps.gov

Wes Green – NPS Safety

BRP Closing Info.           298-0293

BRP Law Enforcement         359-3822 x-210

 

NC Arboretum

Anthony Morrison, Trail coordinator. tmorrison@ncarboretum.org

 

Carl Sandburg NHS

H. Tyrone Brandyburg, Superintendent, 828.693.4178

Jeri DeYoung, Resource Mgr., Jeri_DeYoung@nps.gov

 

Kellogg Center

Stephaney Moore, Dir, 828.890.2050, Smoore@craftcreativitydesign.org

Sec. Jenifer info@craftcreativitydesign.org

Admin Asst. Lauren Pelletier  

  

Holmes State Teaching Forest

 Susan Fay, 828.692.0100, holmessf.dfr@ncdenr.gov, susan.fay@ncagr.gov

Amy Kinsella amy.kinsella@ncagr.gov

 

Johnson Farm

 Joy Owens Dir., 828-891-6585

  

Apparel- hats, jackets, vests, 50-hour patches-AB Graphics, Black Mtn. 669-7305,

Rodney Pressley, Rodney@abgtees.com

 

Emblems

 A-B Emblems, POB 695, Weaverville, NC 28787 828.645-3015

        

RSVP

Patti CameronPatti@LandofSky.org

 

Big Ridge Outdoor

Matt Owen, Brevard, 884-4480,        bigridgeoe@gmail.com,

 

4x4 Club Cadet

Hendersonville 697-7306 

             Asheville 667- 4617, Ron Moore

 

Asheville Citizen - Times

Karen Chávez

Environment/Outdoor Recreation

                   Asheville Citizen-Times

       P.O. Box 2090

      Asheville, NC 28801

      Office: 828-236-8980

      Cell: 828-712-6316

 

Conservation Trust for NC

Rusty Painter

 

Kayakers

            John Grace, 490-1305

 

Southern Appalachian Highlands Conservancy
Yael Girard

                   SAHC Community Farm & Food Assistant

                   4 Wall Street, Suite 502
                   Asheville, NC  28801       

                  www.appalachian.org
                  860-798-8185

 

ECO

Mark Stierwalt, Director   828-692-0385

 

Nantahala Hiking Club

Bill Van Horn, Former President, wavh@email.dnet.net

 

Attachment 2: Resolution on Trail Maintainers

Trail building and maintenance is a key element of the Carolina Mountain Club (CMC)’s mission. At this time we are responsible for approximately 400 miles of trail. While many club members contribute to trail maintenance as section maintainers or as participants in quarterly trail maintenance workdays, a critical portion of our trail maintenance effort is carried out by the club’s trail crews. Many trail-crew members also contribute as section maintainers.

The Club supports trail crews and other trail maintainers in several ways:

  • It negotiates with landowners (Forest Service, Blue Ridge Parkway, State of North Carolina, etc.) for permission to carry out trail maintenance.
  • It provides funding from the club’s general fund and from grants to pay for tools and supplies for trail maintenance, and to reimburse maintainers for mileage for their maintenance efforts.
  • It developed and maintains a web-based system for recording trail issue and hour worked.
  • It funds an annual trail maintainer’s picnic.
  • It supports a recognition system for maintainers who have worked varying numbers of hours, and regularly recognizes individual maintainers with club awards.

Past CMC Councils have approved policies requiring trail maintainers to be Club members. These polices have been justified on two bases: the support the Club provides for trail maintenance and concern that non-members would not be covered by our liability insurance. This later concern is unjustified. Our insurance covers all participants in Club activities – member or not – provided they have signed a liability waiver. Should the terms of our insurance coverage change, CMC would have to reexamine the requirements for participation in all club activities.  While most trail maintainers are club members, a few have not joined. Just as the Club welcomes all on its hikes – member or not – it should welcome all who contribute to our trail maintenance efforts – member or not. However, just as the Club strongly encourages hikers to join after they have participated in a few hikes, the Club should strongly encourage trail maintainers to join after they have participated in a few maintenance activities.  There, be it resolved:

  1. The Carolina Mountain Club Council thanks all trail maintainers for their many thousands of hours of hard work maintaining our hiking trails.
  2. All previous Club policies requiring trail maintainers to be club members are rescinded.
  3. In light of the support the Club provides for trail maintenance, trail maintainers are strongly encouraged to become Club members. Only Club members will be eligible for Club awards, including awards for cumulative hours worked.

 

Approved: August 7, 2014

 

Attachment 3: Konnarock Planning Background Info (Provided by ATC)

Konnarock Partners: A.T. Clubs, USFS, NPS A.T. Park Office, ATC

Purpose of the Konnarock Volunteer Trail Crew

  1. To help A.T. maintaining clubs with large and/or difficult projects, including the backlog of projects created by acquisition, and to address OLR objectives and improve sustainability of the A.T.
  2. To teach crew members, club members, and project participants, through a workshop-like atmosphere, a range of accepted techniques for sustainable trail and shelter construction, reconstruction and management.
  3. To engage volunteers who would otherwise not have the opportunity to work on the A.T.

Club Responsibilities

  1. To oversee completion of project planning and assure good communications for all aspects of the project
  2. To make every effort to have a good turnout of club members to work with the crew
  3. To assign a club member as club and project liaison
  4. To assure that club members know they must use the same safety and PPE standards as the Konnarock Crew and the Konnarock Leader is the leader for the project while the crew is on site
  5. To treat the crew volunteers with respect, as fellow volunteers
  6. (Optional) To provide a cookout, party, or special refreshments for the crew

ATC Responsibilities

  1. To help with planning and assure good communications for all aspects of Crew projects
  2. To provide good crew leadership and logistical and technical support for all projects
  3. To provide a full crew for all projects
  4. To provide administration, which assures a successful, efficient, effective program
  5. To assure adequate funding for the program

USFS Responsibilities

  1. To finalize planning (NEPA) and assure good communications for all aspects of Crew projects (Local District)
  2. To provide logistical and technical support for all projects (Local district, SO)
  3. To provide an adequate base camp, and when possible, trucks and vans for the program (MRNRA)
  4. To provide funding for the crew program (RO)
  5. (Optional but recommended) To meet and greet the crew, provide a safety briefing, and when possible, work with the crew. (Local district)

NPS A.T. Park Office Responsibilities

  1. To provide 5 year planning framework
  2. To provide Trail Inventory framework and funding (FMSS)
  3. To provide operational funding for Konnarock in partnership with the USFS

Konnarock Project Origination:

Projects may be suggested by any part of the A.T. community, e.g., the local A.T. club, USFS, ATPO, ATC or even hikers or other partners. However, each project must also be vetted by the A.T. management partners. As A.T. clubs are delegated management and maintenance responsibility for their A.T. section by ATC, it is the A.T. club’s responsibility to lead the process of project priority setting, NEPA compliance and coordination with their agency partner(s) and ATC. Historically, Konnarock projects have come from three sources:

  1. The Optimal Location Review: The OLR was a comprehensive review and inventory of the A.T. to determine its optimal location and lands needed to provide appropriate protection for the optimal route. Primarily from the mid-80’s to the mid-90’s, every foot of the A.T. on USFS land was inventoried by teams made up of A.T. club volunteers, USFS district personnel and ATC regional office staff. Various alternatives for the optimal route were developed on a case by case basis and a preferred alternative selected and signed off on by the A.T. Club President, the District Ranger, and the ATC Regional Rep. The list of acquisition needs is still used by the USFS and NPS to determine funding and acquisition priorities and the A.T. rehabilitation and relocation list is used to feed the Konnarock project proposal lists. These projects are worked on by priorities chosen by the A.T. clubs in consultation with their partners. Who in your club has a copy of the OLR’s for your club’s A.T. section?
  2. Trail Assessments: TA’s followed OLR’s and predated FMSS. These were a Club/ATC/ATPO effort. TA’s were comprehensive inventories of all the features along the A.T. and included recommendations for relocations and rehabilitation projects. They were partly a tabular, shorthand version of the completed OLR’s but also served a broader purpose. Does your club still have copies of the TA for your club?
  3. The NPS FMSS (Facilities Management System Software): FMSS is our current inventory system for recording A.T. “deficiencies”, A.T. location and other A.T. management related information. This is also a Club/ATC/ATPO effort which does not directly involve the USFS. Using a hand-held computer/GPS unit, A.T. club volunteers and ATC regional staff log information in the field, take photos of “deficiencies”, record a GPS point for each “deficiency”, record a GPS track of the A.T.’s location and prioritize the severity of each project. This information is downloaded into the ATC/ATPO Geographic Information System database to provide detailed reports on current A.T. conditions. Each section of the A.T. is inventoried at least every five years. FMSS is the NPS response to a Congressional request for accountability and the recorded backlog of work serves as the basis for part of ATPO’s budget requests. The list of projects is tracked to see that acceptable progress is being made in relation to appropriated fund expenditures. Deficiencies identified through this process become A.T. club, Konnarock or agency projects. Copies of the FMSS data, plotted on maps and tables and stored on CD’s is provided by the ATPO to A.T. clubs and ATC regional offices on a periodic basis.

 

Konnarock Planning Schedule:

Planning for Konnarock requires a lot of lead time. To dovetail with the NPS budget process we must select Konnarock projects 7 years ahead of time. We must also comply with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) which requires that any ground disturbing activity be carefully reviewed by the agency that owns the effected land. Depending upon the scope of the project this review can result in a categorical exclusion with little public input and minimal documentation or an environmental impact statement for large projects like power lines, etc. A.T. projects usually require either a categorical exclusion or an environmental assessment – both are time consuming and can be expensive. A.T. rehabilitation projects require little oversight while relocations must have field reviews, etc. Field reviews by biologists and archeologists are required as well as consideration of proposals from a forest management and recreation management perspective. NEPA reviews often require at least two years lead time in order for the field reviews, paper work and public involvement to be completed. So here is a rough timetable for an A.T. relocation:

  1. Year 1: Project identification and rough overview; inclusion in NPS Capital Plan
  2. Year 2: Begin field work to support project proposal and obtain signatures
  3. Year 3: Project signed off on by club, district and ATC (pending NEPA approval) and proposal submitted to Konnarock Steering Committee
  4. Year 4: Approved projects built into Konnarock schedule; perform preliminary NEPA scoping and finalize project details for field review and approval by all parties. Document (e.g. flag, GPS centerline). Submit request to land managing agency to initiate NEPA review.
  5. Year 5: NEPA compliance review initiated by agency
  6. Year 6: NEPA compliance work completed.
  7. Year 7: Project initiated

It is important to note that projects which do not require NPS funds or the Konnarock Crew may go through the agency approval process at a faster pace, though NEPA compliance, etc. is still required. In other words, a relocation that will be built by club volunteers may only require two or three years of lead time because it does not need to be included in the NPS budget process or Konnarock Steering Committee approval process. Since many projects enter the planning process, and A.T. club volunteers are most familiar with their club’s A.T. section, it is important for each A.T. club to lead the planning and approval processes by working closely with their agency partner and ATC. To facilitate this process it may be useful to:

  1. Review club, ATC and agency trail management, design and construction manuals and seek training for club members with A.T. maintenance and construction responsibilities, as needed
  2. Review the OLR’s, TA’s, and FMSS data as well as club knowledge to identify potential projects
  3. Select consensus projects, in order of highest priority first
  4. Prepare well designed flaglines and other field work in cooperation with ATC & USFS
  5. Determine project material needs if any, and funding sources
  6. Work out project logistics including material handling and crew access, etc.
  7. Meet regularly with your agency partner and ATC to assure the project stays on track

 

Attachment 4 – Trail Maintenance Awards

CMC Awards

Hours Worked            Award (to CMC Members only)

                50                CMC Patch

              100                CMC Cap

              500                Trail Maintainer’s Patch and blue hooded rain jacket

            1000                Rocker for Patch and copy of the ATC NC/TN Trail Guide

            2000                Rocker

            2500                Fleece jacket with CMC embroidered on front

            3000                Rocker

            4000                Rocker

            5000                Rocker

            6000                Rocker

            7000                Rocker

            8000                Rocker

ATC Awards

Hours Worked            Award (ATC Membership not required)

                   8               ATC Lapel Pin

              100                Patch

              500                Cap

            1000                Sleeveless Fleece Vest

            4000                Plaque

There is no automated system identifying maintainers eligible for awards. The Maintenance Committee is responsible for requesting them from ATC.

At the ATC Biennial Meetings, Silver Service Award Plaques are given to individuals who have maintained the A.t for 25 years, and Gold Service Awards to those who have maintained the Trail for 50 year. Prior to each biennial meeting, ATC requests from club presidents a list of individuals who have qualified for these recognitions.

Forest Service Awards

Times Worked Award

                  2                FS Cap

            1 year              FS Jacket

                50                FS Belt Buckle

Blue Ridge Parkway: Pin for each 100 hours worked

Friends of the MST: FMST awards t-shirts or caps to maintainers who have worked 75 hours or more on the MST in a calendar year.  These awards are available only to members of FMST. 

Attachment 5: Job Descriptions for

Maintenance Committee Responsibilities

Councilor for Trail Maintenance/Chair of the Maintenance Committee

Date Written: 5/29/06                                    By: P. Bodenhorst     

Date Revised:             12/28/14                      By: P. Petersen

Responsibilities

  1. Coordinate the activities of the seven Asheville, Hendersonville, Wilderness and other trail maintenance crews.
  2. Document education and certifications to insure regulation compliance.
    • Coordinate with Partners to provide chain saw certification classes.  (CPR and First Aid certification classes are currently scheduled and provided by a qualified CMC member.)
  3. Assist in the preparation of the annual CMC budget (trail maintenance, mileage reimbursement, picnic)
    • Control annual expenses within the budget
  4. Provide equipment needed by the crews. Utilize input from Crew leaders.
    • Keep an annual inventory of CMC tools.
    • Submit grant requests for tools to supplement the CMC budget.
    • (Currently being managed by Jim Spicer)
  5. Request an annual CMC Disclaimer document from each volunteer- (see attached) (Members may comply on-line while non-members must submit a signed document.  The latter are obtained through the appropriate Crew Leader).
  6. Prepare a volunteer roster.  Provide this roster to Partners upon request
  7. Schedule and conduct periodic meetings of the Trail Crew Leaders. (currently three per year)
  8. Promote training, safety, and leadership building. Ensure that crew leaders have appropriate back-ups.
  9. Schedule an annual multi-crew project to share ideas, techniques and camaraderie
  10. Encourage and be proactive in the recruiting of new volunteers
  11. Maintain relations with
  1. AT and MST Section Maintainers and Supervisors.
  2. ATC SORO
  3. BRP leadership and the BRP Maintenance Supervision
  4. Pisgah Forest District Leadership – Forest Office, PRD, ARD, Nantahala
  5. Cherokee Forest - Nolachucky District
  6. Mt. Mitchell State  Park
  7. Gorges State Park
  8. Chimney Rock State Park
  9. CLMC
  10. The Nature Conservancy
  11. Green River Game Lands (NC Wildlife Commission)
  12. Johnson Farms
  13. Holmes State Education Center
  14. Kellogg Center of UNCA
  1. Attend periodic meetings with significant Partners (FS Districts, BRP, SORO)
  2. Negotiate agreements with Partners detailing the work performed with Partners.
  3. Ensure that trained Section Maintainers are assigned to all sections of the AT and MST.
  4. Schedule and host an annual picnic for trail maintainers.
  5. Determine the recipients of annual hours worked awards.  Obtain and distribute awards from CMC, PRD, ATC to recipients.
  6. Report volunteer hours worked to Partners quarterly. (currently being managed by John Whitehouse)
  7. Review significant trail condition issues observed on assigned CMC trails.  Submit grant requests for remediation funding as necessary.
  8. Determine State trail documentation requirements and submit as necessary.  (MST construction completion.
  9. Update job description as needed.

Communication Responsibilities

  1. Coordinate activities and scheduling with Trail Crew Leaders.
  2. Maintain selected documents/lists on the Trail Maintenance website.
  3. Maintain contacts with CMC Partners

Skills Needed.

  1. Knowledge of the trails assigned to the CMC
  2. Good communication and people handling abilities
  3. Familiarity with tools

Time Required:  8 to 12 hours per week        

Contacts  - See Attachment 1

 

 

CMC Disclaimermer

Trail Crew Leader

Job Title: Trail Maintenance Crew Leader                              By:  P. Bodenhorst

Date Written:  5/30/06                                               

Date Revised:  10/2014                                                          By:  Ann P. Hendrickson

Responsibilities:

  1.  Insure all safety practices are being observed by all crew members; all crew members utilizing specialized equipment have current certification.
  2. Train new crew members in standard/proper trail maintenance techniques.   Follow FS and ATC trail specifications.
  3. Evaluate work performed by crew members and correct (or instruct how to) problems observed.
  4. Select from the CMC Data Base priority listing, the work for each crew outing; maintenance assignment should be suitable to the crew size and capabilities.
  5. Determine equipment, tools, materials, skilled workers, work assignments, needed for a given work assignment.
  6. Scout a repair assignment ahead of time as needed to determine the work /supplies needed to accomplish task.
  7. Write a notice to all crew members outlining the location and project details to prepare the crew for the job; respond to any questions a crew member may have.
  8. Respond to any queries from potential volunteers, and follow up accordingly.
  9. Assign trail crew members tools and maintain an inventory of tools dispensed. Instruct crew members in the proper operation/maintenance of the trail maintenance tools.
  10. Upon completion of the crew outing, record the individual volunteer hours, travel time, and work accomplished in the CMC maintenance data base.
  11. Report any work pending issues, and their priority.
  12. Coordinate with land owners, agencies, or other entities on new construction, relocations, or major renovations.
  13.  Coordinate efforts with other Crew Leaders and the Trails Facilities Coordinator.
  14. Facilitate ongoing training or training opportunities for existing crew members.
  15. Provide a safety briefing to the crew prior to every crew outing.
  16. Account for all crew members prior to leaving the work site; ensure that all vehicles have left the forest and are on firm pavement.
  17.  Arrange for crew carpools.
  18.  Attend and participate in quarterly Crew Leader meetings.
  19. Insure that Leave No Trace (LNT) is practiced by all crew members. Update Job Descriptions for this and Trail Crew members as needed.
  20. Ensure that signed CMC Disclaimers have been obtained from all members of the crew annually.  Obtain a signed Disclaimer from new crew members before they start their first work day.
  21. Designate and train a back-up Crew Leader.

Communications Responsibilities:

  1. Inform the Councilor for Trail Maintenance of crew activities and needs.
  2. Inform crew members of current maintenance issues and club activities.
  3. Submit required information to the Club maintenance data base.
  4. Coordinate with the Trails Facilities Coordinator, other Crew Leaders.
  5. Coordinate with other related organizations.

Comments:

  1. Actively recruit new crew members (as needed)
  2. Provide ongoing training to crew members.
  3. Function as an advocate of the CMC.

Skills needed:

  1. Excellent people skills
  2. Knowledge of trail locations, trail access points
  3. Good mechanical ability; specialized tool certification (or have crew members that do)
  4. Knowledge of First Aid, CPR, and LNT
  5. Knowledge of FS and ATC trail building requirements

Time Required:

  1. In addition to trail hours about 3 hours per week
  2. Administrative hours vary by week
  3. Quarterly Crew Leader meeting attendance

Other Requirements:

  1. Take first aid kit along for every work day.
  2. Must have own transportation.
  3. Incumbent must be a current CMC member.
  4. Recommend incumbent has a current tetanus immunization.
  5. Access to a computer to communicate with crew(s).

Critical Contacts:

See current applicable contact listing

 

Trail Crew Member

Date Written: 5/29/06                                     By: P. Bodenhorst     

Date Revised: 9/2014                                     By: Ann P. Hendrickson

 

Responsibilities:

A. - Trails that have an assigned Section Maintainer

       Perform all rehabilitation work under the direction and guidance of the Crew

           Leader including:

  1. Side hill, narrow trail, new water bars, tread repair, silt bars, cribbing
  2. Rebuild or repair stairs, bridges, wet crossings, and wet areas
  3. Repair shelters, move and construct privies
  4. Tree and/or root removal
  5. Heavy lopping
  6. Assist in building trail relocations
  7. Install information signs and or blazing
  8. Assist Section Maintainers when available (upon request)
  9. Practice Leave No Trace Principles
  10. Perform all assignments according to established safety standards and with proper
  11. equipment

B. - Trails without assigned Section Maintainers

        All above responsibilities plus:

  1. Bi-annual visit to ensure a clear trail that has safe passage for hikers
  2. Lopping, weed eating, debris removal, blazing, water bar cleaning
  3. Clean out water sources, shelters
  4. Assist in the construction of new trails
  5. Report location of any noted work pending
  6. Keep all Certifications up to date (sawyers, weed-whacking)
  7. Assist in the recruitment and training of new volunteers
  8. Function as a swamper for a sawyer 

Communication Responsibilities:

  1. Receive instructions from Crew Leader
  2. Report to Crew Leader
  3. Work as a member of a team
  4. Function as an advocate for the CMC

Skills Needed:

  1. None. Every one works to their ability and pace
  2. (Requisite certification for Sawyer and/or weed-whacking)  
  3. Working knowledge of LNT Principles

 

Time Required:

Varies. Most crews work once a week; typically a session would be an eight hour commitment. Wilderness crews typically work twice a month on a Saturday (but may on occasion camp for the weekend) Quarterly Crew is 4-5 sessions per year.

Equipment Required:

Sturdy work boots, work gloves safety glasses, loppers, personal first aid kit. Trail maintenance tools to be provided/assigned by Crew Leader

Other Requirements:

  1. Arrange own transportation to crew meeting location(s)
  2. Sign waiver/release form; update annually (available the CMC website)
  3. Recommend that all Trail Crew members have a current Tetanus immunization.

Critical Contacts:

Please refer to the Critical Contact list for requisite phone numbers and e-mail addresses


Trails Facility Manager

Date Written:  09/01/2014                                          By :  Ann P. Hendrickson      

Date Revised:                                                             By

Responsibilities

1.   Design, make and/or guide construction, installation, and maintenance of structures and physical features such as shelters, privies, bear cables, bridges and signs on the trails maintained by the Carolina Mountain Club.

2.   Collaborate with Crew leaders, Section Leaders, and/or Section Maintainers in the assessment of the trail issue/condition.

3.   Propose viable solutions including materials needed and costs.

4.   Obtain the requisite approvals (including funding) prior to project initiation.

5.   Participate in the long range planning and the establishment of priorities for trail facilities on trails maintained by the Carolina Mountain Club.

6.   Assist in determining the necessary tools and materials to be purchased/obtained/repaired by the Club as they relate to facilities management.

7.   Notify the Councilor of Trail Maintenance of new initiatives/concepts.

8.   Oversee the construction/renovation/repairs including arranging for transport of materials and equipment to worksite.

9.   Collaborate with the Crew Leader, Section leader, or Section Maintainer the number and skill requirements of the volunteers needed to complete the project.

10.  Perform all tasks in compliance with specifications, standards, guidelines, requirements, and agreements established by FSH6709.11 – Health and Safety Code Handbook, ATC, BRP, MST, PRD & NRD.

11.  Ensure compliance with all memorandum of understanding as it relates to trail facilities.

12.  Comply with all safety standards, including the wearing of safety gear.

13.  Practice Leave No Trace Principles when performing all duties.

14.  Participate in quarterly Crew Leader meetings.

15.  Follow-up on incomplete projects.

Communication Responsibilities

1.   Ensure the Councilor of Trail Maintenance is informed of all work initiatives.

2.   Maintain communication with all (principle) parties involved in a project until project completion.

3.   Function as an advocate for Carolina Mountain Club when fulfilling responsibilities.

4.   Schedule trail facilities projects in coordination with assigned CMC maintenance crew(s).

 

Comments

Incumbent must be a member of CMC

Must have own transportation

Skills Needed

1.  Excellent mechanical ability and wood working skills

2.  Knowledge and skill at operating all tools/equipment necessary to perform responsibilities

3.  Good communication skills

4.  Familiarity with trails maintained by CMC

5.  Knowledge of First Aide

6.  Knowledge of trail standards observed by CMC

7.  Familiarity with LNT practices

8.  Knowledge of requisite safety standards and practices

Time Required

Varies. 10-25 hours per month.

Critical Contacts

Refer to central listing of contacts.

Incumbent reports to the Councilor on Maintenance

 

Wilderness Trail Maintenance Crew Leader

Date Written:  10/2014                                   By:  Ann P. Hendrickson                   

Date Revised:                                                 By: 

Responsibilities:

  1. Observe and practice the accepted standards of wilderness trail maintenance.
  2. Insure all safety practices are being observed by all crew members; all crew members utilizing specialized wilderness equipment have current certification.
  3. Train new crew members in standard/proper trail maintenance techniques.
  4. Evaluate work performed by crew members and correct (or instruct how to) problems observed.
  5. Select from the Data Base priority listing, the work for each crew outing; maintenance assignment should be suitable to the crew size and capabilities.
  6. Determine equipment, tools, materials, skilled workers, work assignments, needed for a given work assignment.
  7. Scout a repair assignment ahead of time as needed to determine the work /supplies needed to accomplish task.
  8. Write a notice to all crew members outlining the location and project details to prepare the crew for the job; respond to any questions a crew member may have.
  9. Respond to any queries from potential volunteers, and follow up accordingly.
  10. Assign trail crew members tools and maintain an inventory of tools dispensed. Instruct crew members in the proper operation/maintenance of the trail maintenance tools.
  11. Upon completion of the crew outing, record the individual volunteer hours, travel time, and work accomplished in the CMC maintenance data base.
  12. Report any work pending issues, and their priority.
  13. Coordinate with land owners, agencies, or other entities on new construction, relocations, or major renovations.
  14.  Coordinate efforts with other Crew Leaders and the Trails Facilities Coordinators.
  15. Facilitate ongoing training or training opportunities for existing crew members.
  16. Provide a safety briefing to the crew prior to every crew outing.
  17. Account for all crew members prior to leaving the work site; ensure that all vehicles have left the forest and are on firm pavement.
  18.  Arrange for crew carpools.
  19.  Attend and participate in quarterly Crew Leader meetings.
  20. Insure that Leave No Trace (LNT) is practiced by all crew members.

Communications Responsibilities:

  1. Inform the Trail Maintenance Chair of crew activities and needs.
  2. Inform crew members of current maintenance issues and club activities.
  3. Submit required information in the Club maintenance data base.
  4. Submit monthly reports to USFS Pisgah District.
  5. Coordinate with Trails Facilities Coordinator, other Crew Leaders.
  6. Coordinate with other related organizations.

Comments:

  1. Actively recruit new crew members (as needed)
  2. Provide ongoing training to crew members.
  3. Function as an advocate of the CMC.

Skills needed:

  1. Excellent people skills
  2. Knowledge of trail locations, trail access points
  3. Good mechanical ability; specialized tool certification (or have crew members that do)
  4. Knowledge/training in Wilderness First Aid, CPR, and LNT
  5. Prefer background/training in wilderness skills and principles
  6. Ability to hike up to 10 miles carrying hand tools/equipment/pack/food/water

Time Required:

  1. In addition to trail hours about 6 hours per month.  Administrative hours vary.
  2. Twice a month crew outings (occasional option of wilderness camping overnight)
  3. Quarterly Crew Leader meeting attendance

Other Requirements:

  1. Take first aid kit along for every work day.
  2. Must have own transportation.
  3. Incumbent must be a current CMC member.
  4. Recommend incumbent has a current tetanus immunization.
  5. Access to a computer to communicate with crew(s).

Critical Contacts:

See current applicable contact listing

 

AT/MST Section Maintainer Supervisor                           

Date Written:  1/2015                                     By:  Ann P. Hendrickson                               

Date Revised:                                                 By: 

Responsibilities:

  1. Recruit new Section Maintainers as needed.
  2. Coordinate with the Councilor for Trail Maintenance to update the Section Maintenance list.
  3. Ensure that new Section Maintainers are trained in standard/proper trail maintenance techniques. (Typically working with a trail crew)   Follow FS and ATC trail specifications.
  4. Instruct Section Maintainers in current safety practices. Ensure that all Section Maintainers utilizing specialized equipment have current certification.
  5.  As time permits, evaluate work performed and correct (or instruct how to) problems observed.
  6. Provide updates (Spring, Summer, and Fall) or reminders to Section Maintainers to work on their assigned section.
  7. Monitor the CMC trail issue reports to have either an entire crew or Section Maintainer resolve open issues.
  8. Coordinate with a Crew Leader, the Section Maintainer, and or, the Trails Facilities Coordinator on any major trail repair/renovation on a section.
  9. Monitor to determine if Section Maintainer are working on their sections.  Address inactivity on section maintenance by determining remedial action and/or whether the Section maintainer should continue in his/her role.
  10. Respond to any queries from potential volunteers, and follow up accordingly.
  11. Assign Section Maintenance members tools and maintain an inventory of tools dispensed. Instruct crew members in the proper operation/maintenance of the trail maintenance tools.
  12. Attend and participate in quarterly Crew Leader meetings.
  13. Ensure that Leave No Trace (LNT) is practiced by assigned Section Maintainers.
  14. Ensure that signed CMC Disclaimers have been obtained annually.  Obtain a signed Disclaimer from new Section Maintainers before they start their first work day.

Communications Responsibilities:

  1. Inform the Councilor for Trail Maintenance of Section Maintainer activities and needs.
  2. Inform Section Maintainers of current maintenance issues and club activities.
  3. Submit required information to the Club maintenance data base.
  4. Coordinate with the Trails Facilities Coordinator and/or Crew Leaders.

Comments:

  1. Actively recruit new Section Maintainers (as needed)
  2. Provide ongoing training to crew members.
  3. Function as an advocate of the CMC.

Skills needed:

  1. Excellent people skills
  2. Knowledge of trail locations, trail access point
  3. Knowledge of First Aid, CPR, and LNT
  4. Knowledge of FS and ATC trail building requirements

Time Required:

  1. Varies depending on time of year and volunteer turnover
  2. Administrative hours vary by week
  3. Quarterly Crew Leader meeting attendance

Other Requirements:

  1. Prefer current Crew Leader; minimum of trail crew member experience
  2. Must have own transportation.
  3. Section Maintainer be a current CMC member.
  4. Recommend incumbent has a current tetanus immunization.
  5. Access to a computer to communicate with Section Maintainer(s).

Critical Contacts:

See current applicable contact listing

 

AT/MST Section Maintainer

Date Written: 12/2014                                                By: Ann P. Hendrickson        

Date Revised:                                                 By:

Responsibilities:

  1.  In the early spring, evaluate your section for blow-downs, tread repair needs, step or   bridge repair needs, while removing litter and other material from the trail.
  2. Check, clean out, and shape waterbars whenever you work your section.
  3. Evaluate and renew all blazing as needed. (in non-wilderness areas)
  4. If there is a shelter on the section, clear all debris that may be in the shelter area.
  5. If there is a privy, follow the established moldering maintenance guidelines.
  6. If there is an identified drinking water source, ensure the water is running freely and clear of all debris or fallen timbers.
  7. As the section requires, lop all overgrowth of foliage, weeds, and brush to maintain at least a 4 foot width of clear trail.
  8. Maintain the width of the trail with minor tread repair using a hazel hoe or similar tool.
  9. Remove, repair, or cover (and/or) report any trail shortcutting.
  10. Remove, repair, or cover (and/or) report any fire rings.
  11. Cut weeds, grass or other foliage from sides of trail using a weed whacker (if certified) or sling blade as needed to maintain a reasonable trail width.
  12. Report all hours worked on the section. Report any issues that require a trail crew and or sawyer.
  13. If possible, work with the trail crew when it works on your section.
  14. Practice LNT.
  15. Be a CMC ambassador when meeting and greeting hikers on your section.         

Communication Responsibilities:

  1. Check CMC website for any trail issues that you can manage
  2. Check the hike schedule to determine if a hike is scheduled for your section and try to      
  3. schedule your rehab work prior to the hike
  4. Report any trail issues that need a crew or sawyer
  5. Function as an advocate for the CMC
  6. Maintain communication with assigned Section Leader

Skills Needed:

  1. Every one works to their ability and pace
  2. (Requisite certification for Sawyer and/or weed-whacking)  
  3. Working knowledge of LNT Principles
  4. Prior experience as a trail crew member; training from a Section Leader               

Time Required:

Varies, each section of trail is unique. Minimally, a trail should be checked early in spring and again in the fall. Some sections require regular weed removal in the growing season.

PLEASE HIKE THE SECTION AND LEARN THE SECTION REQUIREMENTS PRIOR TO AGREEING TO MAINTAIN THE SECTION.

Equipment Required:

  1. Sturdy work boots, work gloves safety glasses, loppers, personal first aid kit
  2. Trail maintenance tools to be provided/assigned by Section Leader

Other Requirements:

  1. Arrange own transportation to section
  2. Arrange for volunteers to assist in maintaining your section if needed
  3. Sign waiver/release form; update annually (available the CMC website)
  4. Recommend that all Trail Crew volunteers have a current Tetanus immunization.

Critical Contacts:         

Please refer to the Critical Contact list for requisite phone numbers and e-mail addresses